Rory Gallagher Tattoo’d lady Rockpalast 1979

A little inspiration for when ure needing that next lift… always great to watch sum1 doing it so well..great song writing…great performance  and the band is on fire with him…the great Rory Gallagher Tattooed Lady

Guitar Outside Playing Made Easy

Guitar Outside Playing Made Easy

by
Tommaso Zillio
Are you tired of playing your guitar always following the same scales and ready to try to play outside the scale? Here I will explain you how to do it!
If you play Blues for Jazz guitar, you know that many players whose sound you like are using “outside” notes to spice up their playing. “Outside” notes are simply notes that are not in the scale that you are using right now – even if in many cases these notes became so widespread that they were eventually incorporated in scales, like the b5 note in the Blues scale, or the “extra” notes in Bebop scales.
Of course if you don’t know how to use the outside notes, they will sound dissonant and “wrong” when you play them. And yet, restricting yourself just to note in the scale can make your solo sound stiff and uninteresting.
The wrong solution is to learn from articles or columns titled “24 ways to use outside notes” or similar. I have seen time and again with my student that in this case less is more: you need ONE good trick, and then you need to master it. If you know 24 tricks, you will not focus in mastering any of them, and so you will not solve your problem.
In the video below I explain one of the simplest and yet most effective way to use outside notes in a Blues or Jazz solo. Sure, it is not the ONLY possible trick (the video would be hours long…), but it’s a great first trick to master and you will get a surprising mileage out of it. Watch the video now.

The only thing you need to do now is to try this trick on your guitar and experiment to find what kind of sounds you can make with it. It’s really easy and you will be able to apply it immediately to your guitar playing.

About the Author
A professional guitarist, teacher, and composer, Tommaso Zillio enjoys particularly writing about music theory and its application to guitar playing