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About Cool Guitars




About Cool Guitars

 

 

Hi there to all you pickers! Welcome to cool-guitars.com where we will gather as much info, resources and have a chat about our much loved art of guitar playing… or maybe noisemaking…
The site was set up by a long time player who was looking for simple advice/lessons on playing, guitars, gear, etc … not technical details on how to build me a nuclear powered amp..lol Just plain old guitar talk!

My students have been asking me many questions over the years and they kept asking for a site to go too where they could just get on and get an easy answer without being made to look foolish.

 





So here it is…send in your questions, ask em even if they seem ridiculous and I’ll try my best… while I don’t know everything – and if a guitarist tells you he knows every scale, etc on the board, they’re lying!- I will try to direct you to an answer you can understand. So if your finished with Guitar Hero and would like Guitar Lessons… look around on the site! Cheers… P.S. check out our resources there’s even a tuner for when you cant find yours!

 

 

 

Guitar Playing Made Easy




Guitar Outside Playing Made Easy

Guitar Outside Playing Made Easy

by
Tommaso Zillio
Are you tired of playing your guitar always following the same scales and ready to try to play outside the scale? Here I will explain you how to do it!
If you play Blues for Jazz guitar, you know that many players whose sound you like are using “outside” notes to spice up their playing. “Outside” notes are simply notes that are not in the scale that you are using right now – even if in many cases these notes became so widespread that they were eventually incorporated in scales, like the b5 note in the Blues scale, or the “extra” notes in Bebop scales.
Of course if you don’t know how to use the outside notes, they will sound dissonant and “wrong” when you play them. And yet, restricting yourself just to note in the scale can make your solo sound stiff and uninteresting.
The wrong solution is to learn from articles or columns titled “24 ways to use outside notes” or similar. I have seen time and again with my student that in this case less is more: you need ONE good trick, and then you need to master it. If you know 24 tricks, you will not focus in mastering any of them, and so you will not solve your problem.
In the video below I explain one of the simplest and yet most effective way to use outside notes in a Blues or Jazz solo. Sure, it is not the ONLY possible trick (the video would be hours long…), but it’s a great first trick to master and you will get a surprising mileage out of it. Watch the video now.

The only thing you need to do now is to try this trick on your guitar and experiment to find what kind of sounds you can make with it. It’s really easy and you will be able to apply it immediately to your guitar playing.

About the Author
A professional guitarist, teacher, and composer, Tommaso Zillio enjoys particularly writing about music theory and its application to guitar playing

My Top 20 Most Influential Guitarists Of All Time

 

O.K… so I have had allot… and I mean allota people ask/ write me asking for my influences. This list, by no means is definite as I have left out my punk, heavy metal, reggae, jazz and classical influences deliberately, was as close as I could get without going overboard and turning this post into a super list. I hope some of the names get you looking them up on You Tube or wherever you want for inspiration and some good old electric guitar mayhem. As I say have fun and just play! Cheers, Admin.
20.Buddy Guy
19.B.B.King
18.Jimmy Page
17.Buddy Guy
16.Eric Clapton
15.Robert Johnson
14.Muddy Waters
13.Allan Holdsworth
12.Joe Satriani
11.Eddie Van Halen
10.Steve Vai
9.Yngwie Malmsteen
8.Keith Richards
7.Stevie Ray Vaughan
6.John Lee Hooker
5.Frank Zappa
4.Johnny Winter
3.Chuck Berry
2.Randy Rhoads
1.Jimmy Hendrix

Of course feel free to comment with your lists or any guitarists out there who you feel deserve a mention..

Is Reading Music a Necessary Skill?

Spot Light

Tommaso Zillio is a professional teacher, guitarist, and composer, and is your go-to guy for any and all  music theory related questions. This gentleman is highly recomended by cool-guitars.com and hopefully will continue to grace our pages. Please feel free to check out his websites for any help,he will help in any way possible.

Tommaso Zillio,
Professional Guitarist and Teacher
http://www.tommasozillio.com
http://www.edmontonguitar.com
http://www.musictheoryforguitar.com

Juampy Juarez – a demonstration of a Master

It is blues performed by Juampy Juarez as a demonstration of his Master Class “Contrapuntal Improvisation”.
These classes are for the advanced to very advanced player but if you want some ear candy, listen to this MASTER, and I mean MASTER guitar player with a great attitude and personality to go with it. PS you cant beat his so cool name too! Enjoy!

Guitars


A Fun Chord Progression Chart for Learning a Guitar Chord Progression

A Fun Chord Progression Chart for Learning a Guitar Chord Progression

Author: Jason Y.

A guitar chord progression chart doesn’t need to be complex to sound good. When musicians look at a chord progression chart they often look for simple chord progressions. This is especially true with many guitar players. What is one simple guitar chord progressions? Where did it come from?

A Simple Guitar Chord Progression and It’s Mechanics

One simple guitar chord progression is the I, IV, V, iv chord progression. In order to understand this progression more clearly we should look at an example. Let’s look under the hood of a C major chord progression (A major chord progression is often simply called a chord progression.).

Major Scales and How They Contribute to Progressions

First, we must know the C major scale because it has the same letter name as a C chord. The C major scale has a C, D, E, F, G, A and B note. We will call the C note the 1st note and the D note the 2nd note etc. A chord progression comes from the 1st, 4th, 5th and 6th notes. Therefore, the C chord progression is made up of the C, F, G, and A minor chords (The sixth note leads to a minor not a major chord.). Now we know how to get major chord progressions. How about minor chord progressions?

Under the Hood of Minor Chord Progressions

A common minor chord progression is the i, iv, V progression. Let’s say we want to find a C minor chord progression. A minor chord progression is made up of the 1st, 4th and 5th notes. The 1st and 4th notes become minor chords because the Roman numerals are lowercase (i, iv). On the other hand, the 5th note becomes a major chord because the Roman numeral is uppercase (V). Anyways, the i chord will be a C minor chord. The iv chord will be a F minor chord. Finally, the V chord will be a G chord. How about some different progressions that are not common to rock or folk music?

Different Chord Progressions

Some common jazz progressions include the ii, V7, I form. Jazz also has forms like I, vi, ii, V7 and the ascending II, VII, II VII. Which chord progressions should we learn?

What Beginners Should Study

I would advise beginners to study the I, VI, V, vi chord progression. Of course, popular musicians do not always use this progression though it’s very common. However, it gives us a basic understanding of music and music theory. If we know this progression in every key then we can sound very professional despite inexperience. Of course, we should also know guitar tuning, rythym (I would advise learning basic drumming though it’s not the only way.), chord memorization and a basic knowledge of the guitar fretboard chart (root notes, movable chord shapes etc.). Since were discussing scales and thier relations to progressions let’s look at chord construction.

What are chords made of?

A major chord is made up of the C, E, and G notes since C, E and G are the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes in a C major scale. On the other hand minor chords are made up of the 1st, flatted 3rd and 5th notes of a major scale. Therefore a C minor chord would have a flatted E. Finally, 5th chords are composed of only the 1st and 5th notes. So we can say that a C 5 chord is made up of a C and G note. Now, let’s go back to the main topic.

Conclusion

The guitar chord progression chart are for that matter any chord progression chart isn’t difficult to understand. Of course you don’t need to know music theory. For example, you can simply memorize the C major progression (C, F, G) or the D major progression (D, G, A). However, knowing where it came from gives us an edge. For example, some beginner musicians cannot easily play uncommon progressions (For example, a person might want to play a guitar song in C # (sharp)). However, you might be able to easily figure out an uncommon progression without the aid of a chord progression chart. In addition, if you can understand the guitar fretboard chart (and movable chords and scales) then you will be able to quickly find the chords themselves not just the progressions.

In conclusion, the guitar highway begins with many things and one is the chord progression chart.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/a-fun-chord-progression-chart-for-learning-a-guitar-chord-progression-673117.html

About the Author

Jason Y. – I’m 32 and have been playing drums and guitar since my youth in northeastern Tennessee.

http://www.freemusicstudy.com/guitar-major-chord-progression.htm has major guitar chord progressions in all keys. There is also a study of transposing and other music theory topics. A fun power guitar chords chart, cool guitar fretboard chart, and awesome chord charts are included.

Some Easy To Learn Guitar Chords

Here Are Some Easy To Learn Guitar Chords That You Must Know

Author: Liam Gibson

There are a few basic chords that show up in a good majority of songs over the years. These are the basic chords that every beginner must learn.

Learning The Basic Chords

There is a challenge that all inspiring guitar players face and that is having to learn the basic guitar chords. One might ask why it’s important to learn the guitar chords. Guitar chords are what form the songs, especially when dealing with rock and pop genres. They provide harmony to both the melody and instrumental solos of the songs.

If you think back to some of the older songs like, “Back in Black,” by AC/DC or “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” by The Who’s, it is the rhythm that makes them memorable. The rhythm is a result of playing guitar chords. The really great thing about learning guitar chords is that once you know between ten and fifteen chords you can play thousands of songs.

First of all it’s important to know what a chord is. A chord is three or more different musical notes played together. When referring to playing a guitar, it would be strumming or plucking at least three strings at once. This will sound three or more notes depending on how many strings are used. A guitar normally has six strings so the greatest number of notes you can play in a chord would be six. There are three basic groups that all chords fall into depending on the structure of the chord. These groups are: Major, Minor, and Seventh. All three of these groups has a unique sound. The major chords have a very complete and stable sound. Minor chords give you a feeling of sadness or depressed mood whereas the Seventh chords have a more incomplete sound and are more upbeat.

If you go looking for a list of “basic guitar chords” you will not find one. This is because not everyone agrees on how many there are. They do agree that every guitar player must master guitar chords, it’s just a difference in number. Some believe that there are only 8 chords while others think there are 18. These simple guitar chords are used in all types of musical genre. It does not matter whether you are just starting out or have been playing for years you need to know these basic chords in order to successfully play the guitar. If you learn to play guitar chords then you will have the basic tools and the skills you need to play songs.

Now, you might be asking yourself, what are the basic guitar chords that I need to learn. Well, they include four common keys, A, G, C and D and the major and minor chords for each. The chords are played as “open chords,”. An open chord is where at least one string in the chord is not fretted or pressed down using one of your fingers. These chords are easier to learn and play than other chords like Barre chords or more complex chords that require you to go higher up on the neck of the guitar. There is a basic list of major and minor chords and they are as follows:

A Major (A), A Minor (Am), C, D, Dm, E, Em, F and G

The best way to learn these chords is by keys or as a chord family. These can all be put together into what is called chord sequences, which is what you use to create songs. This method is a lot funner and useful than just making a list of guitar chords to learn and memorizing them.

The chords that are grouped by family or key are:

A Family (Key of A): A, D, E

D Family (Key of D): D, Em, G, A

G Family (Key of G): G, Am, C, D, Em

C Family (Key of C): C, Dm, Em, F, G

Here are some tips to help you with learning the basic chords of the guitar:

1. Choose one chord family and stick with it until mastered. By doing this you can actually start playing right away and you get a quicker feeling of accomplishment.

2. Make sure that you have a chord chart with you. This chart will provide you with a diagram so you can make sure your fingers are in the correct positions.

3. Pick an easy song and learn the chords for that song first. Many of the songs out there only use three chords and by doing this you can put your new skills to work immediately.

4. Make sure that your guitar is tuned. Ensure that each string sounds the way that it should and also that you are only hitting the strings that should be played.

5. Practice makes perfect. You need to practice every day. Practice going from one chord to another and try to do it faster every time.

6. Learn the basic chords before going on to the harder ones. Start off slow and work your way up.

7. Once you have the basics done move onto the minor and seventh chords.

8. Don’t forget to have fun with the new skills you now have. Use the chords to play several different songs that you know well and show them off to your friends and family.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/here-are-some-easy-to-learn-guitar-chords-that-you-must-know-1276558.html

About the Author

Liam Gibson of LearnGuitar-User-Reviews.com, specializes in helping aspiring guitarists get the info that they need to make the right choices. Liam, a stage guitarist himself, leads his team of guitar experts to constantly review new courses and products in the market and make sure you get the best value products that work for you. Check out actual user reviews and feedback of the most popular guitar courses at LearnGuitar-User-Reviews.

Beginner Guitar Chords Made Easy

Beginner Guitar Chords Made Easy

Author: Guitar Lessons for Beginners

One of the first skills you’ll need to master as a guitar player is playing chords. While there are literally thousands of different chord forms possible on the guitar, we’ll focus on a few basic beginner guitar chords that can then be moved and altered to obtain many more chords later on. These can also be used right away to learn easy guitar songs.

Different Flavors

You’ll learn guitar chords of all kinds, but ultimately there are two basic kinds of chords in music: major and minor. Every possible chord can be lumped into one of these two types. Major chords are built from major scales and have a ‘happy’ sound, while minor chords come from minor scales and tend have a ‘sad’ sound. While some songs use only one kind of chord, most songs and chord progressions mix major and minor chords. Let’s start with major chords.

Major Chords

Major chords are based on major scales and use the first, third, and fifth notes of the scale. We’ll start by focusing on five major chords: C, A, G, E, and D. Learning guitar chords like these will open up a whole world of music for you. Each chord diagram below shows you where each string should be fretted, and with what finger. We’ll start with open chords, which means that one or more open (as in not fretted) strings are included. Open strings are shown with a ‘0’ in front of the first fret. Let’s take a look at G major, which contains the notes G, B, and D:

G Major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E|-|—|—|-4-|—|—|

B|-|—|—|-3-|—|—|

G|0|—|—|—|—|—|

D|0|—|—|—|—|—|

A|-|—|-1-|—|—|—|

E|-|—|—|-2-|—|—|

Notice that you need to get your middle finger all the way to the third fret of the bottom string, with the first finger on the second fret of the A string. Be sure to roll your wrist forward and curl your fingers so all the strings can ring clearly. Try picking just the A string: if you can’t hear that B note clearly, curl the middle finger a bit more so it avoids the A string. This will be a constant focus as you learn how to play beginner guitar chords: all the notes need to ring clearly for it to sound good. Strum downwards with your pick, then upwards: you want all the notes to sound as closely together as possible, so strum quickly.

You can also play G major with an open B string:

G Major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E|-|—|—|-3-|—|—|

B|0|—|—|—|—|—|

G|0|—|—|—|—|—|

D|0|—|—|—|—|—|

A|-|—|-1-|—|—|—|

E|-|—|—|-2-|—|—|

This form is more commonly used in folk and country, while the first form is more common in rock music. This has to do with the B, which is the major third: with a distorted tone the third can cause some ugly overtones when played on the higher strings. As you learn guitar chords, be sure to try playing them with a variety of tones and pay attention to what sounds best to you. Also practice getting your fingers to the right places as quickly as possible. Be patient: learning guitar chords takes time and practice. Focus on getting a clean sound from all the notes and you will improve quickly.

Let’s take a look at another very common chord, E major (E, G#, B):

E Major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

B |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

G |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

D |—|—|-3-|—|—|—|

A |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

The guitar e chord is pretty easy to fret, and again you’ll notice that all the strings are strummed. Pay attention to the fingerings: learn the wrong fingerings now and you’ll have bad habits that will hold you back later on. Now let’s look at A major:

A Major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

B |—|—|-3-|—|—|—|

G |—|—|-1-|—|—|—|

D |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

A |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

E |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

Notice that ‘x’ on the low E string? That means that string isn’t supposed to be strummed. Even though E is part of the A major chord (A, C#, E), the low E makes the chord sound too muddy and hides the A root note. So, after you’ve twisted your left hand fingers around the chord, pay careful attention to only picking the top five strings. Also, make sure you can hear the high E string. This is actually one of the more difficult beginner guitar chords you’ll learn, simply because your fingers are in such a small area. Stick with it, though, and follow the suggested fingerings.

Once you can play A major, try switching between E major and A major. Take your time: a very slow, clean transition with all the notes sounding clearly will sound much better than a bunch of missed notes and muted strings. Once you can move back and forth, try a simple beginner guitar rhythm: Strum E twice, then A twice, and so on. Start very, very slowly, then try to pick up the speed a bit. You’ll quickly see why the suggested fingerings should be followed: notice that the first finger stays on the same string and just moves one fret up, while the other fingers sort of jump around the first finger.

Now let’s add another chord, and then we’ll try a tricker transition. Here’s C major (C, E, G):

C major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

B |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

G |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

D |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

A |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

E |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

Notice that once again the low E string is not sounded. On this chord you can let the third finger touch the E string a bit; this can help mute any unwanted noise from the string. Be sure to keep a strong pressure on the A string, though.

Now, here’s another beginner guitar rhythm: try strumming G twice, then C twice, and so on. This is a trickier transition because all your fingers have to jump around pretty quickly. Take it slow: as you’re learning guitar chords the focus needs to be on a clean, ringing tone. Keep practicing this rhythm until you can move back and forth between G and C quickly and cleanly.

There’s one more open major chord to learn. Here’s D major (D, F#, A):

D Major

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

B |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

G |—|—|-1-|—|—|—|

D |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

A |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

E |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

There are a couple of variations of this chord worth learning. You can add the open A string for a bit more depth, and you can also add an F# on the low E string:

D Major with low F#

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

B |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

G |—|—|-1-|—|—|—|

D |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

A |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

E |—|—|-T-|—|—|—|

The ‘T’ means that you need to curl your thumb around the neck and fret the F#. It’s almost impossible on a lot of acoustics, but if you’re playing an electric, and especially if you want to play any sort of hard rock genre, it’s a valuable form to know. If you can’t get it now, don’t worry: it’s not usually taught when you’re learning how to play beginner guitar chords; think of it as an optional extra challenge.

Get Those Fingers Dancing

Now that you know a few major chords, try moving back and forth between them. You might notice that some of the chords sound better together than others: for example, G, C, and D sound great in a pattern together, as do E, A, and D, whereas G and E might sound a bit awkward played one after the other. Experiment and listen carefully; you now know enough cords to start creating your own songs, so practice, practice, practice! Here’s an easy beginner guitar rhythm to make practicing more interesting: start on any chord and strum it four times. Switch to another chord and strum four more times. Now switch to a third chord, strum it two times, move back to the second chord two times, and then go back to the original chord and strum it four times as well. Using G, C, and D, it would look like this: G, G, G, G, C, C, C, C, D, D, C, C, G, G, G, G. See? Even if you don’t know how to read guitar notes yet, you can still make music!

Minor Chords

The difference between major and minor chords lies in the second note of the chords (the third scale tone). In minor chords the third is a half-step lower than in major chords. So, for example, E major contains the notes E, G#, and B, while E minor contains E, G, and B. Here’s the fingering for E minor:

E minor

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

B |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

G |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

D |—|—|-3-|—|—|—|

A |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

Notice what a huge difference changing that one note makes to the sound of the chord! As you learn guitar chords, be sure to always compare the major and minor forms, paying attention to the sound of the chords and the fingerings. Here’s A minor:

A minor

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

B |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

G |—|—|-3-|—|—|—|

D |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

A |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

E |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

Notice that your second and third fingers ‘jump’ up one string from E minor. Try strumming back and forth between those two chords: it’s an easier transition that sounds great. Now let’s look at D minor:

D minor

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

B |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

G |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

D |-0-|—|—|—|—|—|

A |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

E |-x-|—|—|—|—|—|

Notice that the fingering is quite a bit different from D major. That’s fine, because it’s pretty unlikely that you’ll move between those two chords in a song. As always when practicing how to play beginner guitar chords, focus on clean sound and avoiding strings that shouldn’t sound.

The Barre Chord

You’ve learned all the basic open chords, and practiced until you can move between them smoothly and even begin to learn easy guitar songs. Now it’s time to take on one of the more challenging beginner guitar chords: the barre chord.
This is a chord form that can be played on any fret of the guitar because it doesn’t use any open strings. Instead, your index finger forms a bar across the fretboard, playing three notes at once. To make this work you need to rotate your wrist way forward, get that finger as flat as possible, and really dig into the fretboard. Here’s what it looks like on the first fret, which gives you the F major chord:

F major barre

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

B |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

G |—|—|-2-|—|—|—|

D |—|—|—|-4-|—|—|

A |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

E |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

In terms of learning guitar chords, this is the rite of passage: master the barre chord and you’ve officially learned how to play beginner guitar chords. It isn’t easy, but don’t give up! Pick each string one at a time and make sure you can hear each note ring clearly. If the notes on the first finger aren’t clear, make sure the finger is flat and pressed tigh against the strings. This is not a natural position, so don’t be discourage if it’s not perfect at first. This will strengthen your fingers, improve your coordination, and make it easier to learn guitar chords that are more advanced and require larger stretches.

Once you’ve mastered the major barre chord, it’s easy to play the minor chord form: just lift up your middle finger, like so:

F minor barre

0 1 2 3 4 5

E |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

B |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

G |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

D |—|—|—|-4-|—|—|

A |—|—|—|-3-|—|—|

E |—|-1-|—|—|—|—|

Now you can move either of these forms up the neck to play any chord you need; the name of the chord is simply the note your index finger is playing on the two E strings.

That’s it for this lesson: you’re a master of beginner guitar chords, have learned a beginner guitar rhythm, and know the barre chord, which opens up lots of possibilities. The next lesson will continue with more chords, more rhythms, and a song to liven things up. See you there!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/beginner-guitar-chords-made-easy-1130183.html

About the Author

For Video Guitar Lessons for Beginners That Makes Learning Beginner Guitar Easy Visit:
http://www.myguitarlessons.net.